The First Map Project is the first language map created from an Indigenous perspective with the inclusion of ‘lost’ language groups. This project combines the performative aspect of art creation and storytelling through technology. Winya Indigenous Furniture has facilitated the combination of the two in order to achieve a cultural education experience that is a modern take on the traditional communication method for Indigenous history, through art forms. This Language Map combines community involvement with cultural education in an interactive way which is very different to current existing language maps.

History of Language Maps

Language Anthropologists Norman B Tindale, David Horton, Alfred Reginald Radcliffe-Brown and Daisy Bates have all consulted with Indigenous groups to create language maps of Australia. These maps are centred around colonialist ideas of land ownership and the need to accurately mark out territories. Indigenous Language groups are more fluid than these western depictions of language maps communicate. The boundaries marked out by these anthropologists were in fact areas of trade for resources, culture and language.
This is why the creation of a map that represents Indigenous Language groups from an Indigenous and community perspective communicates the fluidity and sharing of culture and language between language groups and the project itself shares this information with greater Australia.

Language Anthropologists Norman B Tindale, David Horton, Alfred Reginald Radcliffe-Brown and Daisy Bates
have all consulted with Indigenous groups to create language maps of Australia. The three maps pictured

to the right are examples of existing maps and they have been created from a western colonialist perspective marking out territorial boundaries as definite lines.